Mike Love Radio_Open:

(singing).

Mike Love:

If no one has told you by now, your Mike is on. Yep, Mike Love here, Mike Love Radio Podcast, and we’re up to no good again because there’s just so much stuff happening. It’s driving me crazy. I don’t know what to do. I don’t know if I want to laugh, I want to cry, I want to sing, I want to dance. I am totally confused, I can tell you that. Attorney David Smalls from Dallas, Texas is hanging out with us. The big boss, our producer, and director EZ-E Eric is here, and Allen Day is here. So let’s put our hands together for our esteemed guests.

Mike Love:

Thank you, fellas. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. And we just got so much stuff to talk about. It’s just mind-boggling. And just when you thought everything was over with, Drew Brees had to go open his big mouth, and we’ll talk about that momentarily. But I want to get right into this because David and I have had these conversations about the NFL and Colin Kaepernick. And Allen and I and Eric have talked about it and had in-depth conversations. One of the things that we want to really just get into, did the NFL lose sight on what’s important to black players besides being compensated or wanting to have key positions in the league? And our episode title this week is the NFL Failures Episode Three, Season One. And I’m going to get David involved first and foremost. David, welcome to the show.

David Smalls:

Man, I have to say, it’s a pleasure, and I’ll do anything for Mike Love. And Mike, as you know, for the benefit of your audience, I’m an entertainment attorney. I do television, music, and film, a lot of social media. And you and I met on a deal, a major radio deal and I have the utmost respect for your opinions, even when we disagree, it’s always fun talking to you.

Mike Love:

That’s a lot.

David Smalls:

Even when we disagree, yeah.

Mike Love:

That is a lot. Well, the NFL, Roger Goodell… and we got some statements coming up from him momentarily that’s come out. And I’m going to say, David, I told you, I told you, I told you. Now David and I got… man, I almost thought we were going to lose the relationship. I knew it wasn’t really going to happen.

David Smalls:

No, you didn’t. No, you didn’t. You knew better.

Mike Love:

Allen, it was kind of bad. When you get into it with your attorney, okay, and he’s supposed to be defending you, and we on the opposite sides.

David Smalls:

We were on opposite sides of Colin Kaepernick.

Mike Love:

Right.

David Smalls:

And yeah man, I’m a big Kap fan. I think that everything he’s doing and that he did and was willing to pay the price for, he deserves respect. He deserves respect.

The Big Boss Eric:

I agree.

David Smalls:

Yeah. It’s hard to not respect that.

Mike Love:

Yeah. And the thing that I said to you in the very beginning, I said, “David, I’m not disagreeing with you on that.” All I’m saying is he had no help. To take on a challenge like that was a big risk in his career. And of course, there were other players who participated, but Roger Goodell said it best and we’ll get into that in a minute, but-

The Big Boss Eric:

Wait. Did Roger Goodell say something that was actually good?

Mike Love:

Yeah. Well, I’m not talking about whether it’s good or bad, but we got a comment from him and we’re going to play that momentarily.

David Smalls:

He did not. He had to pull back now.

Mike Love:

Yeah. So guys, just hold on a minute. We’re going to get to it. Now, should we-

David Smalls:

No, no, no.

Mike Love:

I’m sorry. Go ahead, David.

David Smalls:

No. But, Mike, when we disagreed, you felt that Colin Kaepernick’s actions were misdirected.

Mike Love:

[crosstalk 00:04:24] No, I did not say that they were misdirected. [crosstalk 00:04:28]. Here we go.

David Smalls:

You said that he should be focused on community efforts. And I said, what he’s doing, the fact that he’s doing it is something, and it’s significant. And it must be significant thing-

The Big Boss Eric:

What is he doing now?

David Smalls:

Well, when he brought attention to the issue by kneeling, obviously, it attracted somebody’s attention because it became a national issue.

The Big Boss Eric:

But was that enough?

Mike Love:

Now, what did you say Eric?

The Big Boss Eric:

My position on it is, is it’s not enough. I think that he went pretty far, and I agree with my dad to a degree that there is a thing where you really should have that support behind when you’re with your teammates because that would have made like the ultimate movement. And that’s what Roger Goodell said when he said that without African American players there would be no NFL.

Mike Love:

Okay. But guys, I got some commentary coming for him, so he can be defended on his own words. So let’s just hold up on that, we’ll get to that in a second. What we really, really want to get into is this first part about what David and I were saying, and he’s kind of going in the wrong direction at what I said. I did say he should be working more in the community, but at the same time… and Eric, you and I said that yesterday, when we were talking to Allen. But I said he needed the help of the NFL and he didn’t have that. Now, David, how are you going to get on this podcast and say I said something totally different?

David Smalls:

What was your question?

Mike Love:

Okay, I said, you were right that I made the statement about the community, but at the same time, I was saying he had no help from the Players’ Union or his fellow players, and it was going to fall on deaf ears, which it did in the very beginning.

David Smalls:

I don’t know if it was deaf ears, but certainly, the players, once they came down and once the weight of the nation came down on these players, they folded.

Mike Love:

Okay, but let’s go back.

David Smalls:

They folded.

Mike Love:

Let’s just go back for a minute. Okay. And I got a statement-

Allen Day:

I have a question for you. So do you believe that it would have been conducive for Colin Kaepernick to wait until he had approval by the Players Association and the players before he decided to step up and take on that role of an advocate for our community?

Mike Love:

Well, I think it’s part of his job, he needed the cooperation of the Players’ Union. He couldn’t tell the other players what to do. And we’ve talked about these numbers before, 1100 NFL players, 70 to 80% of them are African American. And let’s say 50% of them have other responsibilities, like a wife, kids, homes. A lot of these guys come from dysfunctional upbringings. And so, to have this money, five, 10, $15 million coming in a year and somebody is talking about we should strike or we should protest or even walk away from a game, is a lot for a lot for those players to think about. And so the strategy I was questioning with David was, did he talk to them? Did they understand? And obviously, they did because there were players that were also taking a knee, not just on this team with the 49ers, but across the league. But it almost looked like a failure.

David Smalls:

Well, they were taking a knee at first, but then remember, once the pressure hit, people had to decide whether they would take a knee or not. And that very first week, that’s the week Jerry Jones came out and he took a knee with the players and all that stuff. But then after the pressure really got on him, they started standing up…

Mike Love:

Well, I got a question.

David Smalls:

Standing up.

Allen Day:

I got a question. Should Colin Kaepernick be proclaimed as a hero of justice? Is he now the savior of the Black Lives Matter movement? I want to play a statement that he made three years ago. Standby.

Audio – Colin Kaepernick:

There’s a lot of things that need to change. One specifically is police brutality. There’s people being murdered unjustly and not being held accountable. Cops are getting paid leave for killing people. That’s not right. That’s not right by anyone’s standards.

Mike Love:

So he was like a psychic. He was absolutely correct.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

Okay. [crosstalk 00:08:44] Yeah, for a minute. Who didn’t know that?

David Smalls:

Exactly.

The Big Boss Eric:

Not to downplay that by any means. I think that’s one of the most ultimate things that we’re fighting about in today’s time, however, you can’t go, in my opinion, take a knee and then go fall off the face of the earth. And you can’t tell me that he didn’t have the same platform as he used to because if that was the case, Nike wouldn’t be giving him such a large endorsement. I think at the end of the day, you have to take something like that, even if you did it by yourself, even if you didn’t have the backing of the NFL, the Players Association, none of that stuff. When you decided that you were going to go take that knee, whether you were by yourself or not, you have to carry that torch all the way through. You can’t just-

David Smalls:

Well, and I would say this, obviously, you don’t follow him on Twitter, because if you did he’s [crosstalk 00:09:35]-

The Big Boss Eric:

[crosstalk 00:09:37] Let me address that. Let me address that. Because I can tell you guys right now [crosstalk 00:09:41]-

Mike Love:

[crosstalk 00:09:40] All right guys, one at a time, one at a time.

The Big Boss Eric:

I’m going to tell you both why that’s the most irrelevant argument that you could ever make. I didn’t have to follow him on Twitter to see him take that knee. He used his platform to reach people no matter if they were following him or not, which was what made that such a prolific statement because you couldn’t ignore it. So you have to keep up that momentum. Talk to me in a way that I cannot ignore it. If I have to go follow you on Twitter, if I have to go find what you’re doing, you’re not giving out the same amount of relevance. You’ve taken it a step down at that point.

David Smalls:

He was taken down.

The Big Boss Eric:

[crosstalk 00:10:20] at that same level where you started. If he wanted to just do that, then he should have made a statement on his Twitter, and then it could have been a Twitter thing. But he didn’t [crosstalk 00:10:30] on Twitter. He did it-

David Smalls:

[crosstalk 00:10:31] thought-

Mike Love:

Okay, so let’s let David come in for a minute. Go ahead, David.

David Smalls:

The whole purpose of firing him was to take away that platform.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

Absolutely.

The Big Boss Eric:

Well, guess what? Nike gave him a note.

David Smalls:

That’s where he was going to… Nike gave him some money, but they didn’t give him a league. He doesn’t have the same platform. [crosstalk 00:10:54] He could use his platform-

The Big Boss Eric:

If he wanted to use that circuit, any kind of circuit, if immediate circuit, however, he wants to communicate. You mean to tell me you wouldn’t have given him a platform to listen based upon what kind of controversy that statement cause? And believe you me anything where advertising is involved, they’re going to be all over that because there [inaudible 00:11:15].

David Smalls:

No, he did speak. You see him around, but I don’t know if he played guitar. He can’t put a band together, he ain’t on tour. The man ain’t on tour.

The Big Boss Eric:

Everybody else [crosstalk 00:11:27]-

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

Oh my God.

The Big Boss Eric:

… when they’re doing stuff.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

So everybody else, so here’s the question, the initial question or the initial comment was that who else is out there using the platform to speak on behalf of the unknown? The voices-

The Big Boss Eric:

It don’t matter because he not doing it. So you can’t say that [crosstalk 00:11:46]-

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

So the fact that Colin Kaepernick went on a will and risked not only his life but his entire career to speak on a cause.

The Big Boss Eric:

I think it’s noble, but why die on that sword if you’re not going to do anything else [crosstalk 00:11:58]?

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

But who are we to [crosstalk 00:12:01] determine if anyone die on the sword?

David Smalls:

Let me ask you this.

Mike Love:

Okay, hold on, one at a time, David, you go.

David Smalls:

Now, let me ask you this. What do you suggest he could have done that would have been a bigger audience than national TV, NFL? What else could he-

The Big Boss Eric:

Allen hates this answer, but I think the most obvious, the most direct answer he could have did was hit any kind of media start getting-

David Smalls:

Bull shit.

The Big Boss Eric:

… and it’s not because you need your five minutes of fame. He’s already famous. You have to-

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

That’s called cloud chasing.

The Big Boss Eric:

No. Cloud chasing is when you’re trying to stay relevant.

David Smalls:

No, but that’s not specific.

The Big Boss Eric:

And if you’re just trying to stay relevant for your fans, that’s one thing. What I’m saying is, you use that same ability to keep reaching people each way you can to support that message when you knelt out there. Because I support his message, but I feel like he should have kept it going a lot harder because he had the voice that other people didn’t have, but squandered it.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

So-

David Smalls:

Once again, I want to jump in. I want to say that’s not a specific answer because you still didn’t say what he should have done. He used his social media. [crosstalk 00:13:10]

The Big Boss Eric:

[crosstalk 00:13:12] I’m talking about you could have been on ESPN.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

Cloud chasing.

The Big Boss Eric:

You could be on-

David Smalls:

Not if they didn’t want to.

The Big Boss Eric:

… You could be on the sports channels, regular channels, news channels. You could be in newspapers. You can be reaching people other places than just your [inaudible 00:13:26] places, where people just happen to be tuning in and can hear your message whether they intended to or not. That’s a difference than being followed on Twitter.

Mike Love:

All right. Now, hold up, Big. I want to give Allen about 30 seconds because we got to keep it moving. So what do you say, Allen?

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

No, at some point, I believe that, yeah, you can go out here and pull out a ad or commercial, and go to Jay Leno or go on CNN and speak this message. But at some point, you’re going to have some mobilize and create a platform, a structure such as Know Your Rights, where you can go out there and execute change.

Mike Love:

It needs to be holistic.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

No, it doesn’t have to be cloud chasing.

The Big Boss Eric:

That’s not cloud chasing.

Mike Love:

Okay. So now, we’re going backwards and forwards on that. And I think that we all have our different opinions based on the amount of time, the three years that has happened and whether he did good if he did bad if he should have waited if he should have gone. That goes on and on, but let’s not forget about Roger Goodell. Okay. Now, did Roger Goodell fumble the ball in this process? That’s a question that I have. And he says, and I quote, “without black players, there would be no National Football League.” Let’s take a listen to what he was saying.

Audio – Roger Goodell:

It’s been a difficult time for our country, in particular black people in our country. First, my condolences to the families of George Floyd, Brianna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and all the families who have endured police brutality. We, the National Football League, condemn racism and the systematic oppression of black people. We, the National Football League admit we were wrong for not listening to NFL players earlier and encourage all to speak out and peacefully protest. We, the National Football League believe black lives matter. I personally protest with you and want to be part of the much-needed change in this country.

Audio – Roger Goodell:

Without black players, there would be no National Football League and the protests around the country are emblematic of the centuries of silence, inequality, and oppression of black players, coaches, fans, and staff. We are listening. I am listening, and I will be reaching out to players who have raised their voices and others on how we can improve and go forward for a better and more united NFL family.

Mike Love:

So with a statement like that, does it mean that no matter what Colin Kaepernick did, if the NFL didn’t embrace it, it wasn’t on him, it was on the NFL? Would you guys agree? Eric?

The Big Boss Eric:

All I was going to say was, where is the mention of the Colin? When I feel like any kind of company, any kind of statement, when you fail to mention the obvious, it means nothing.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

Absolutely. And to me, to piggyback on there, it’s a reflection, it’s a character flaw overall. You know what I mean? So when I listen to that, and he specifically mentioned black players, but he didn’t mention Colin Kaepernick, the guy who used that platform to speak-

The Big Boss Eric:

Exactly.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

… on behalf of the issues that we’re dealing with in society, and he didn’t mention them at all. In fact, he blackballed him from the NFL.

The Big Boss Eric:

Exactly.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

To me, it falls on deaf ears. And everyone knows that because when you’re talking about black players, Roger Goodell is speaking specifically to Colin Kaepernick.

The Big Boss Eric:

He went a coward not to mention his name.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

100%.

David Smalls:

I agree. And this is a case of saying the absolute minimum. He couldn’t have said any less. He talked about the oppression of players, coaches, and staff. Man, being in Dallas, I don’t know any black man in Dallas that’s over 21 years old, that at some point hadn’t been wrongfully harassed by policemen somewhere. I don’t know anybody, especially if you start talking about somebody 30, 35 years old, at some point in their life, something has taken place. And for him to only mention them and then say, the oppression of some people and then list them by names, I mean, man, it’s the oppression of an entire race for centuries. It’s a systematic way of doing things that used to be legal up until the last 30 or 40 years. So yeah, he said the bare minimum, but I applaud him for saying something. He could have continued with that old line he was carrying about the flag, the stuff that Drew Brees was talking about, but he didn’t go there.

The Big Boss Eric:

Well, that tells you right there, I feel like that somebody else probably wrote that for him because they went to him and was like, yo-

David Smalls:

It was for PR.

The Big Boss Eric:

… and that’s the thing. You can tell when something is genuine when it comes from the heart, and obviously, he’s going to approve anything that they say. So why aren’t you being more direct? I’m not asking him to be like Ben and Jerry’s, and I think you by now have seen their tweets. And that was like, yes, I love chunky monkey ice cream, but now, I’m giving Ben and Jerry’s on my money because I see that they’re not afraid to say what needs to be said.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

Well, another creative way, hell, he could have just mentioned the specifics of the oppression that’s happening in his league and the NFL…

The Big Boss Eric:

That true.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

… where they had to implement the Rooney Rule, just to interview black coaches. You get what I’m saying?

The Big Boss Eric:

Yes.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

And when you look at the percentages of black quarterbacks in a league, it’s still an issue. And when you look at those black quarterbacks, the expectations of those black quarterbacks is to not be a traditional quarterback. Talking about the oppression in this league, let’s be specific, let’s be detailed. You get what I’m saying? If you’re scared to speak about Colin Kaepernick, let’s at minimum talk about the issues that’s in the NFL.

Mike Love:

Well, you bring a good point up. And the thing of it is the question then becomes, which is bigger Black Lives Matter or the NFL participating or not participating? So I would believe it’s Black Lives Matter. Correct?

David Smalls:

I don’t understand. [crosstalk 00:20:00] I don’t understand what you mean.

Mike Love:

Well, I’m just saying, we’re putting a lot of conversation in what the NFL didn’t do. Okay. And just like he said, bringing up the Rooney Rule that you got to have this to make sure that you get qualified coaches and so on and so forth. And even when you have it, they don’t have to hire a person of color to coach the team, it’s just an opportunity to be interviewed. Okay?

David Smalls:

Exactly. Exactly.

Mike Love:

But a few minutes ago, I think it was Allen that was just talking about how big, how [inaudible 00:20:28] this really was overall because it’s about the police brutality. And so, we got to find solution. We can stay on this whole path where, he should have did this and they should have did this, and I don’t know why they didn’t do this. And the question becomes, how can we win? That’s question. Now, what I want you guys to do is listen to Kimberly Jones. Eric sent this to me a couple of days ago. She’s the author of the book, I’m Not Dying with You Tonight. I got cautioned to bring to the table. There are some explicit words used in this segment. So please stand by.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

I’ve been seeing a lot of things, talking of the people making commentary. Interestingly enough, the ones I’ve noticed that have been making the commentary are wealthy black people. Making the commentary about, we should not be rioting, we should not be looting, we should not be tearing up our own communities. And then, there’s been an argument of the other side of, we should be hitting them in the pocket, we should be focusing on the blackout days where we don’t spend money. But I feel like we should do both, and I feel like I support both, and I’ll tell you why I support both. I support both because when you have a civil unrest like this, there are three types of people in the streets. There are the protesters, there are the rioters, and there are the looters.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

The protesters are there because they actually care about what is happening in the community. They want to raise their voices, and they are there strictly to protest. You have the rioters, who are angry, who are anarchists, who really just want to fuck shit up, and that’s what they’re going to do regardless. And then, you have the looters. And the looters almost exclusively, are just there to do that, to loop. Now, people are like, “Well, what did you gain? Well, what did you get from looting?” I think that as long as we’re focusing on the what, we’re not focusing on the why, and that’s my issue with that. As long as we’re focusing on what they’re doing, we’re not focusing on why they’re doing it.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

And some people are like, “Well, those aren’t people who are legitimately angry about what’s happening. Those are people who just want to get stuff.” Okay, well then, let’s go with that. Let’s say, that’s what it is. Let’s ask ourselves, why in this country in 2020, the financial gap between poor blacks and the rest of the world is at such a distance that people feel like their only hope and only opportunity to get some of the things that we flaunt and flash in front of them all the time, is to walk through a broken glass window and get it? That they are so hopeless, that getting that necklace, getting that TV, getting that change, getting that bed, getting that phone, whatever it is that they’re going to get, is that in that moment when the riots happen, and they present an opportunity of looting, that’s their only opportunity to get it. We need to be questioning that why. Why are people that poor? Why are people that broke? Why are people that food insecure, that clothing insecure that they feel like their only shot that they are shooting their shot, by walking through a broken glass window to get what they need?

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

And then, people want to talk about, “Well, it’s plenty of people who pull themselves up by their bootstraps and got it on their own. Why can’t they do that?” Let me explain to you something about economics in America. And I’m so glad that as a child, I got an opportunity to spend time at PUSH where they taught me this. Is that we must never forget that economics was the reason that black people were brought to this country. We came to do the agricultural work in the South and the textile work in the North. Do you understand that? That’s what we came to do. We came to do the agricultural work in the South and the textile work in the North. Now, if I right now, if I right now decided that I wanted to play Monopoly with you, and for 400 rounds of playing monopoly, I didn’t allow you to have any money. I didn’t allow you to have anything on the board. I didn’t allow for you to have anything. And then, we played another 50 rounds of monopoly and everything that you gained and you earned while you were playing that round of Monopoly was taken from you. That was Tulsa. That was Rosewood. Those are places where we built black economic wealth, where we were self-sufficient, where we owned our stores, where we owned our property, and they burned them to the ground.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

So that’s 450 years. So for 400 rounds of Monopoly, you don’t get to play at all. Not only do you not get to play, you have to play on the behalf of the person that you’re playing against. You have to play and make money and earn wealth for them, and then you have to turn it over to them. So then for 50 years, you finally get a little bit and you’re allowed to play. And every time that they don’t like the way that you’re playing or that you’re catching up, or that you’re doing something to be self-sufficient, they burn your game. They burn your cards. They burn your Monopoly money. And then, finally, at the release and the onset of that, they allow you to play and they say, “Okay, now you catch up.” Now at this point, the only way you’re going to catch up in the game is that the person shares the wealth. Correct? But what if every time [inaudible 00:25:33] shared the wealth, then there’s psychological warfare against you to say, “Oh, you’re an equal opportunity hire.”

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

So if I played 400 rounds of Monopoly with you, and I had to play and give you every dime that I made, and then for 50 years, every time that I played, if you didn’t like what I did, you got to burn it. Like they did in Tulsa, and like they did in Rosewood, how can you win? How can you win? You can’t win, the game is fixed. So when they say, “Why do you burn down the community? Why do you burn down your own neighborhood?” It’s not ours. We don’t own anything. We don’t own anything. Trevor Noah said it so beautifully last night, “There’s a social contract that we all have, that if you steal, or if I steal, then the person who is the authority comes in and they fix the situation. But the person who fixes the situation is killing us, so the social contract is broken.” And if the social contract is broken, why the fuck do I give a shit about burning the fucking Football Hall of Fame, about burning a fucking Target.

Audio – Kimberly Jones:

You broke the contract when you killed us in the streets and didn’t give a fuck. You broke the contract [inaudible 00:26:50] for 400 years, we played your game and built your wealth. You broke the contract when we built our wealth again on our own, by our bootstraps in Tulsa. And you dropped bombs on us when we built it in Rosewood and you came and you swatted us. You broke the contract. So fuck your Target. Fuck your Hall of Fame. Far as I’m concerned they can burn this bitch to the ground, and it still wouldn’t be enough. And they are lucky that what black people are looking for is equality and not revenge.

The Big Boss Eric:

Oh my God, that is the most powerful, last sentence that she could have ever stated.

David Smalls:

Yeah man, my heart goes out to that lady because obviously, she is hurting. My heart goes out, she’s hurting. I share her passion, but I have to say, man, despite all of her energy, I still disagree with her conclusion. I hear all the math, but I come up with a different answer.

Mike Love:

And what’s your answer, David? [crosstalk 00:28:02].

David Smalls:

I would say this, I think that we certainly have to demand change now, but I don’t think that the destruction of the property of people who… because there are some people who are innocent, who had their stuff taken and they’re absolutely scared. I’ll give you an example. One of my best friends, they’re one of the first retailers in the Bishop Arts District. This is a black couple. And they were fearful when they said that the protesters who go to come through there because they had just torn up downtown, a couple of days before. So this friend of mine called me and asked me if they could borrow my guns.

Mike Love:

Wow.

David Smalls:

And I said, “Man,” I said, “that’s a bad idea.” Number one, if you need to borrow a gun, you don’t need one. You know?

Mike Love:

I know you weren’t trying to make a funny, but that was funny.

David Smalls:

Yeah. [crosstalk 00:29:11]-

Mike Love:

But you’re absolutely correct.

David Smalls:

Yeah, if you’re in the heat of the moment, you need to borrow a gun, you’re the last person that need to have one.

Mike Love:

Hold on before I kill you. Somebody give me a gun.

David Smalls:

Yeah. But the pain that they felt. And this is somebody, all they do is help the community and hire people in one of the busiest districts down there, and they were in fear. When you go around tearing up stuff indiscriminately. … Now, I will say this, it’s one thing… because when she broke it down and said, there are the protesters, there are the anarchists, and then there are the looters. The looters that are looting indiscriminately, I’m not down with that. The protesters, of course, I’m down with. The anarchists that are going for something out of principle, like I could see… And not that I’m advocating this, don’t get me wrong. But say somebody went down and wanted to tear up a Confederate statue or something. That’s-

Mike Love:

To Robert E. Lee, and that’s happened.

David Smalls:

But that’s totally different than looting.

Allen Day:

So here’s the thing like for me, I didn’t receive that from her message. The message was centered around the different types of people that’s demonstrating. She didn’t say she agreed with the looting, she simply says she understood while it exists. And she basically gave a detailed argument on why it exists. It’s nothing to agree there. You know what I mean? And we all know when it comes to a protest, a protest is designed to be loud. It’s designed to be disruptive. That’s what it is. Obviously, these things happen, but she didn’t say she agree with it. In fact, she concluded saying that she’s lucky that we’re not all out there looking for revenge.

Mike Love:

Wow. That’s pretty profound. And once again, how can we win? That question will go on from now until the end of time. Because I don’t think a lot of things are going to change, but I think we got some serious movement. And we got to thank social media for that because the level of communication keeps us all involved. That music that you’re hearing in the background says we got to go, but I want to thank everybody for hanging out Mike Love Radio Podcast today. David Smalls, thank you man, and you’re welcome to come back anytime you’d like. All right, now Allen Day, I’m always in the background of conversations with you and our producer, EZ-E, and I just had to have you on the show and you’ve been a delight, and thank you for your commentary. We really appreciate it. Thank you so much, brother.

Allen Day:

Hey, it was such an honor to come on, and I’m always open to jump on it, and just be an asset.

Mike Love:

All right. EZ, I love you boy, and we’ll do it again on the next episode. And for you guys and gals out there, listening, stay with us on Mike Love Radio.

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